Kune’s Journey to a Thousand Meals

Food and drinks

Kune’s Journey to a Thousand Meals


A Kune Food staff member packs food at the facility. March 3, 2022. PHOTO | DIANA NGILA | NMG

Summary

  • Most delivery services distribute food from restaurants or third-party supermarkets, but Kune cooks its food from a central kitchen, with customers paying through the Kune Foods website or mobile app.
  • Chef Roman Wamburu says pork and chicken are the most popular dishes, followed by beef and goat.
  • Kune Foods launched its services in January 2022 after raising 114 million shillings ($1 million) in pre-seed funding from local and international investors.

Food delivery services have become big business, thanks to the pandemic. Today, Kune Food, a delivery service, began serving and distributing meals including chapati, mbuzi fries, traditional greens and Nigerian jollof rice from its kitchen at the Arboretum in Nairobi. .

“We saw an opportunity to meet the needs of workers who want to order meals that aren’t fast food,” said Brian Samoei, chief operating officer.

Most delivery services distribute food from restaurants or third-party supermarkets, but Kune cooks its food from a central kitchen, with customers paying through the Kune Foods website or mobile app.

Chef Roman Wamburu says pork and chicken are the most popular dishes, followed by beef and goat.

“We change our menus every day, says Roman, the chef whose team produces 40 meals a day.

Kune Foods launched its services in January 2022 after raising 114 million shillings ($1 million) in pre-seed funding from local and international investors. They are now in the second phase of fundraising, targeting $3.5 million (399 million shillings) to support plans to increase production capacity and a nationwide footprint.

“We expect to serve over 1,000 meals a day by the end of the first quarter,” says Faith Mwendia, the general manager. The company has more than 70 employees, including managers and customer service employees.

Faith

Faith Mwendia, Managing Director of Kune Food at the food tech company’s Arboretum. March 3, 2022. PHOTO | DIANA NGILA | NMG

The commercial kitchen, equipped with locally produced equipment ranging from sealing machines to food warmers, can produce 8,000 meals a day and Kune has also set up four additional distribution centers in Nairobi. It includes cooking stations, ovens, food preparation, meal assembly and storage areas.

Through contract services, Kune has already signed agreements to provide lunches to corporate clients and a few retail outlets.

So how do they manage their low cost meals from 250 Sh to 360 Sh considering the high cost of food?

Mr. Samoei, the operations manager, says they buy “directly from farmers and suppliers, we regulate the internal costs of food production and also handle last mile delivery logistics.”

Once cooked, the food is placed in a blast chiller which quickly lowers its temperature “to less than 4°C degrees because the food danger zone is between 4°C and 60°C”, explains chef Roman, whose career in hospitality spans 20 years. years, with experience in Kenya, United Arab Emirates and Qatar.

Although a meal can be kept for up to 72 hours in the refrigerator, demand from their customers means they prepare fresh meals every day.

Chef Roman says the food delivery model is sometimes more difficult than a regular restaurant because “we do mass food production instead of one meal at a time. Plus, you don’t get customer feedback until much later, so we have to make sure every meal is perfect.

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