Starbucks closes all dining rooms in Cleveland as COVID-19 cases rise

  • Starbucks is closing all of its dining rooms in Cleveland, a company spokesperson told Cleveland.com.
  • The spokesperson said the decision was based on local factors related to COVID-19.
  • Other restaurants and shops have reduced their opening hours as staff call in sick.

Starbucks is closing all of its dining rooms in Cleveland, Ohio as the number of COVID-19 cases rises.

Area stores will only serve take-out orders beginning Wednesday, Jan. 12, a company spokesperson told Cleveland.com.

Customers can still order in-store, on the Starbucks app and at the drive-thru, but will not be able to consume their sandwiches and drinks in the lobby, the spokesperson said.

The spokesperson said the decision was based on local factors related to COVID-19.

“As we have done since the start of the pandemic, local leaders can, and do, scale operations based on partner availability and local COVID-19 factors,” the spokesperson told Cleveland.com.

Starbucks did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment made outside of normal working hours.

Other restaurants and stores have reduced their opening hours and limited their services due to the increase in COVID-19 cases. Nike, Walmart and Macy’s are among the companies slashing working hours as more employees become sick with the virus.

Airlines and transport providers have also reduced their services, canceling flights and reducing the number of metro services.

Coronavirus cases are skyrocketing in the United States. Ohio’s seven-day rolling average of new cases hit a record high of 22,000 on Saturday, though that figure has since fallen to 19,000, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By comparison, at the height of last winter’s spike, the state’s seven-day rolling average hit 12,529.

The rise in cases comes amid the spread of the Omicron coronavirus variant. Studies suggest the variant is more transmissible than previous variants like Delta, although some data suggests its symptoms seem milder.

Growing staff sickness isn’t the only staffing issue retailers and restaurants are facing.

Employers say they’re still struggling to find enough workers amid record quit rates, forcing some restaurants to cut hours, cut menus, ditch on-site dining and increase fees. price. Americans quit their jobs to find better wages, benefits and hours, go back to school, change industries or retire early.

Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson said on the company’s October earnings call that some stores had reduced evening hours due to staffing shortages.

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